HOW IS IDENTITY EXPLORED + EXPRESSED THROUGH OUR FEATURED ARTISTS WORK

Iryna

Life is about movement, developmen and change. Each second the cells in our body become different. Despite of constand physiocal change we are afraid of emotional and environmental transitions. Even those are for good. Our brain loves predictability and routines. But to keep brain activity strong and prevent brain deseases we need to study, making things in a new way. These creates confrontation and contradiction. Constant need and been afraid of change makes us powerful and vulnerable. 

My paintings and stories are about how we may overcome this. How we fight our change demons - those we are so afraid of so we stop on our ways to our dreams. I use my coaching background to collect the materials - stories itself and art to tell them in visual way. Bu using complicated, layered and bols colours and shades in abstract manner I appeal to subconscious part ot observers.

Diamanto

Through my art, I get to know myself more and more every day. (what a blessing!) My performing arts background trained me to impress and seduce an audience through skill and virtuosity. I now find myself uninterested in the illusion of spectacle, craving honesty and seeking rawness in everything I do and am. This part of myself drives my artistic practice and my interest in photography, making me fall in love with moments of spontaneity more and more. Therefore, I am always looking for honesty in everything I capture through my lens as if this is my only way of showing the world the truth - what we really are. 

Emily

As someone who is both Cypriot and American, I grew up feeling torn between my two cultures. Like I was two different people who didn’t quite fit in anywhere. When I found weaving, it felt like the two parts of myself were finally being woven together, much like warp and weft are woven together to make cloth. It gave me a sense of wholeness that I hadn’t experienced before.

 

Since then I’ve discovered that I have weavers on both sides of my family. Every time I stand at the loom, I feel connected to my ancestors and all the weavers around the world who wove before me. It is this connection that grounds me creatively and personally. 

Evdokia

The artist explores an object by focusing on changing its function and subject matter.  In this way, Evdokia alters and explores the identity of the object and in a sense the identity and the object’s role in the domestic and public spaces. The identity of objects could be transformed when changing and testing its function. Most of the time, the material of an object plays the most significant role in the object’s functionality and thus its identity. That’s the reason, the artist prefers to alter the objects’ materials and reject their default appearance and functionality thus challenging their identity.

Kiara

Life is about movement, development and change. Each second the cells in our body become different. Despite of constand physiocal change we are afraid of emotional and environmental transitions. Even those are for good. Our brain loves predictability and routines. But to keep brain activity strong and prevent brain deseases we need to study, making things in a new way. These creates confrontation and contradiction. Constant need and been afraid of change makes us powerful and vulnerable. 

My paintings and stories are about how we may overcome this. How we fight our change demons - those we are so afraid of so we stop on our ways to our dreams. I use my coaching background to collect the materials - stories itself and art to tell them in visual way. Bu using complicated, layered and bols colours and shades in abstract manner I appeal to subconscious part ot observers.

Konstantina

NoFilterNeeded is a 15-minute performance for the theatre stage and gallery space,
that invites viewers to experience the fluidity of human form and identity. The work explores the concept of constructed self (the way we see ourselves and we invite to be seen), where self-image, personality and self-concept is not perceived as a fixed notion but as a fluid one. Like a fluid altering states, our self-image is constantly formed as we grow throughout our lives. 

 

The performance takes inspiration by the fact that, social media users can construct their own self-image by choosing what to post online about themselves and their lives. It’s title, #NoFilterNeeded, refers to the commonly used phrase on facebook, twitter, Instagram, when posting an image online that hasn’t been enhanced by the use of ‘filters’. It is used to state what is real and what is artificial, and here I use it to refer to a personal journey of discovering authenticity, the courage to present and accept myself the way I am. 

 

This performance is a duet between myself and a large silvery blanket which is used as an extension of my own body and self, as a disguise. While moving with it or under it, I become a fluid restless entity which constantly reinvents itself by transforming to different shapes, embodying different entities, anxiously seeking to find a concrete form, a form that is both acceptable and comfortable. This material becomes my new skin mirroring on its shiny surface the desire to feel accepted, loved, thus reflecting one of the deepest human desire, the one of belonging.


The performance was commissioned by the Ministry of Culture, education, Sports and Youth of Cyprus and presented in November 2019, as part of the 19th Cyprus Choreographic Platform, at the Rialto Theatre (Limassol,Cyprus)

Maria

'Women in intimate spaces' was created during covid times. I wanted the viewer to look at the woman and feel something. If my paintings were alive, I would want the viewer to have a conversation with the woman. The whole world was at home during Covid and creating these beautiful spaces was a way to escape the monotony of being at home amongst my Ikea furniture and living room full of kids' toys.

 

'Pixel' takes a normal photograph and manipulates it. Up close, it is difficult to determine what it is but from far it makes sense. I also happen to have terrible eyesight and when I am not wearing my glasses, I see the world in pixelated form. I have always wanted to paint this effect. So I guess I identify as a short-sighted person with limited vision.

Melissa

I explore identity trying to represent, specific sensations and capture moments, that create
memories. Memories create your identity.

Nuné

I believe all works of art are self-expressive and they fall into the category of identity art.  With my own practice, the stories I choose to explore and create are directly linked to my values and ideologies.


Exploring your identity is all about making choices and reflecting upon them, whether they create harmony within you or not.

The process of creation is filled with choices. I discover what is significant to me, in which ways I can express that and how I can deliver this information to the audience successfully.


It is clear to me, that my work focuses on humanity, relating with each other, creating safe
connections and building true intimacy. The expression of my deepest desires.

Phemia

Any piece which explores identity inevitably exudes the identity and individual culture of the creator themselves. In this project I explored my own identity as a Cypriot woman and the concept of identity in general by interviewing the closest people around me – both friends and family – and asking them what makes them feel Cypriot, whether it be their appearance, their idiolect, or the people and activities they engage with. The responses I recorded were much longer and often more mundane than I expected! What was made clear is that many of us feel tied to Cyprus through everyday objects and activities, many of which we do not actively process or see as being “Cypriot” things – for instance, our buildings, the summer heat, men selling batiha (watermelon) on the side of the road. Identity – both my own and of other Cypriots – is reflected in the shots I capture and how these are processed by other Cypriots. For instance, the shots of my grandfather tending his field, or the image of my grandmother embroidering a tablecloth on her sofa are capable of producing a sense of nostalgia or familiarity in other Cypriots, along with the words that are spoken by the Cypriot people I interviewed.

I am excited to continue exploring the fluidity of identity – and especially Cypriot identity – in my upcoming work. In future projects I would be interested in studying how the feeling of Cypriotness is not just reserved for those who are wholly ethnically Cypriot; it is also felt by those who are half or a quarter Cypriot, and more exceptionally those with no Cypriot ancestry who have grown up in Cyprus or have lived here long enough to equally understand and feel what it means to be Cypriot.

Renay

The main theme of my work in recent years has been gender identity. I paint a lot about my body and what my skin has experienced, with the label ‘woman’. The bulk of my work explores my dysphoria in my own body and how i perceive myself in the mirror - or in public. This can be seen in my large scale canvases of figures or in my abstract self portraits. Prior to understanding the term non-binary, my work was still heavily focused on documenting my emotional processes, which could be understood as a way of me understanding my identity.

Sarah

 I feel that the character throughout the whole film has a sense of being lost. She is trying to find herself, and throughout the film the different anger outbursts/tantrums give a sense of rebellion, or even an identity crisis, in which she is searching inwards to find herself. The changes in mood throughout shows her multi-dimensional identities and that from the first second until the last moments of the film, she is not only one thing, but several things; she is truth but also lies, she is happy but also sad, she is erotic but also mad, she is red but also blue, etc. Improvisation was my basic tool for creating movement, as it helped me explore the movement of the clothing simultaneously with creating choreographic content.  Music also played a vital role, and is usually the first thing that inspires any of my creations, and is utilized throughout the whole choreography in relation to the
theme.


Stella:

Exploring the complexity of the self has been a constant theme in my work, fashion is a form of self-expression, and I am interested in looking at that through a sociological point of view. In “Tales of a Lost Self” I chose the Lolita subculture as a starting point because of the importance of a dual self, as well as its depiction of ultra-femininity and how it is perceived by the media. Dressing up is not necessarily a daily act for “Lolitas” the attire is almost like a way with them to get in touch with their overly feminine “alter ego” or their “other self”. It shows that identity is made up of many layers that at times might not coexist with each other.I created underlayers of activewear that are my interpretation of exaggerated femininity celebrated by Lolitas. As for the over layers I designed translucent skirts and dresses whose volume is constructed by folds. The rough embroideries are a response to the negative stigma surrounding ultra-femininity in pop culture.